• mobile car valet Trim, County Meath

    Mobile Car Valet and Detailing in Trim, County Meath

    Need a Mobile Car Valet Trim, County Meath? Is your car grubby, dirty and looking dull? Detailing need to be done? We can solve your problems by using the highest standard of  full valet and car detailing products for a quick and easy way to bring your car back to life!

    Fast, Free Quote | Book a Car Valet| Ask a Question

    Using our expertise and highly professional knowledge of the car valeting required for all vehicles, we can ensure that we do the best job for you. Your car van or jeep will come up looking like brand new. You will be love the results.

    Call to book your Mobile Car Valeting in Trim, County Meath on 089 4461147

    Mobile Car Valet in Trim, County Meath

    What you get when booking AutoLuxe mobile car valet in Trim, County Meath:

    Arrive on the time you scheduled
    Provide you with a fully qualified car valet and detailing
    Provide you with a specific timeslot
    To work efficiently and minimise disruption
    Fast reliable local mobile car valeting service
    Fixed price labour on carpet cleaning
    Strict Code of conduct for our valeters

    car detailing Trim, County Meath

    Trim (Irish: Baile Átha Troim, meaning “town at the ford of elderflowers”)[3] is a town in County Meath, Ireland. It is situated on the River Boyne and has a population of 9,194. The town is noted for Trim Castle – the largest Cambro-Norman castle in Ireland. One of the two cathedrals of the United Dioceses of Meath and Kildare — St Patrick’s cathedral — is located north of the river. Trim won the Irish Tidy Towns Competition in 1972, 1984, and 2014 and was the “joint” winner with Ballyconnell in 1974. Traditionally Trim was the county town of Meath, but this title was passed on over time onto larger, neighbouring town Navan

    At an early date, a monastery was founded at Trim, which lay within the petty kingdom (tuath) of the Cenél Lóegairi. It is traditionally thought to have been founded by St. Patrick and left in the care of its patron saint Lommán, also locally known as Loman, who flourished sometime between the 5th and early 6th century.[4] When domestic politics endangered the position of Lommán’s foundation, the church of Armagh assimilated Lommán into the dossier of St. Patrick, making him a disciple of that saint.[4] Attackers burned the church several times in the twelfth century, during which it was refounded as an St. Mary’s Abbey under Augustinian rule. The abbey church was the sanctuary for “Our Lady of Trim”, a wooden statue reported to work miracles. The statue made Trim a major pilgrimage site from at least 1397. During the Reformation the statue was burned and Henry VIII dissolved the abbey. The abbey’s bell tower, the “Yellow Steeple”, is the primary remnant of St. Mary’s.

 
Facebook Rating
5.0