• mobile car valet Nobber

    Mobile Car Valet and Detailing in Nobber

    Need a Mobile Car Valet Nobber? Is your car grubby, dirty and looking dull? Detailing need to be done? We can solve your problems by using the highest standard of  full valet and car detailing products for a quick and easy way to bring your car back to life!

    Fast, Free Quote | Book a Car Valet| Ask a Question

    Using our expertise and highly professional knowledge of the car valeting required for all vehicles, we can ensure that we do the best job for you. Your car van or jeep will come up looking like brand new. You will be love the results.

    Call to book your Mobile Car Valeting in Nobber on 089 4461147

    Mobile Car Valet in Nobber

    What you get when booking AutoLuxe mobile car valet in Nobber:

    Arrive on the time you scheduled
    Provide you with a fully qualified car valet and detailing
    Provide you with a specific timeslot
    To work efficiently and minimise disruption
    Fast reliable local mobile car valeting service
    Fixed price labour on carpet cleaning
    Strict Code of conduct for our valeters

    car detailing Nobber

    Nobber (Irish: an Obair, meaning “the work” – referring to a moat around a Norman castle)[1] is a village in north County Meath, Ireland.The village is located near a river called the Dee (from Irish Abha Fherdiea, meaning ‘river of Ferdia’) and near Whitewood Lake, which is situated in the townland of Whitewood. It is on the Navan–Kingscourt road (R162) about 12 miles (19 km) north of Navan. This places the village about 37 miles (60 km) from the M50 motorway ; the orbital motorway of Dublin. The town of Kells is to the west and the town of Ardee to the east and the town of Kingscourt is to the north. Villages that border the parish are Kilmainhamwood, Moynalty and Kilbeg to the west, Castletown to the south and Drumconrath and Lobinstown to the east.

    The Normans were the first known people to settle at Nobber. The site acted as a strong-point on the road from the ports of Drogheda and Dundalk to the midlands. The Lordship of Meath was granted to Hugh De Lacy by King Henry II of England in 1172 in his capacity as Lord of Ireland. De Lacy granted the Barony of Morgallion to Gilbert de Angulo, who constructed a moate and bailey there. Recently[when?] several high crosses were discovered in the village’s old cemetery (St Johns) dating from possibly the 10th century. These are smaller and less ornate than typical Celtic high crosses. This find is significant because it suggests that a hitherto unrecorded monastic settlement once existed on the site of the village.[citation needed] Moynagh Lake, to the west of the village, is the site of a multi-period crannóg which dates to Mesolithic times. In the Medieval period, Nobber was the chief town of the Barony of Morgallion, and was variously expressed as “Middle English: Nobire, Nobbir, Nobir, Nebyre, Nobyre, Nober'””.

 
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