• mobile car valet Dalkey

    Mobile Car Valet and Detailing in Dalkey

    Need a Mobile Car Valet Dalkey? Is your car grubby, dirty and looking dull? Detailing need to be done? We can solve your problems by using the highest standard of  full valet and car detailing products for a quick and easy way to bring your car back to life!

    Fast, Free Quote | Book a Car Valet| Ask a Question

    Using our expertise and highly professional knowledge of the car valeting required for all vehicles, we can ensure that we do the best job for you. Your car van or jeep will come up looking like brand new. You will be love the results.

    Call to book your Mobile Car Valeting in Dalkey on 089 4461147

    Mobile Car Valet in Dalkey

    What you get when booking AutoLuxe mobile car valet in Dalkey:

    Arrive on the time you scheduled
    Provide you with a fully qualified car valet and detailing
    Provide you with a specific timeslot
    To work efficiently and minimise disruption
    Fast reliable local mobile car valeting service
    Fixed price labour on carpet cleaning
    Strict Code of conduct for our valeters

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    car detailing Dalkey

    Dalkey (/ˈdɔːki/; Irish: Deilginis, meaning “thorn island”) is one of the most affluent suburbs of Dublin,[2][3][4] and a seaside resort southeast of the city, and the town of Dun Laoghaire, in Ireland. It was founded as a Viking settlement and became an active port during the Middle Ages. According to chronicler John Clyn (c.1286–c.1349), it was one of the ports through which the plague entered Ireland in the mid-14th century. In modern times, Dalkey has become a seaside suburb that attracts some tourist visitors. It has been home to writers and celebrities including Jane Emily Herbert, Maeve Binchy, Hugh Leonard, Bono, Van Morrison and Enya. The village and broader area lie within the jurisdiction of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council.

    The town is named after Dalkey Island, just off shore. The name is derived from the Irish deilg (“thorn”) and the Old Norse ey (“island”).